Weekend Classes on Saturdays in Houston, Texas

If inappropriate displays of anger is creating problems in your personal life or work environment but you don’t have the time to attend classes on a weekly basis this series of weekend classes is idea for anyone who wants to improve their anger and fear control skills.

Class Schedule:

It is recommended, but not required, all Self Referral and Employer Referral students complete 24 Hours of Anger Management Classes to receive a Certificate of Completion.

The 24 Hours can be completed in 4 weeks if you attend four consecutive 6 hour Saturday classes. However, you can take up to 5 weeks to complete the course.

Other Class Options are available:

  • 6 Hours Classes – Certificates Available!
    The 6 Hours can be completed in 1 day.
  • 12 Hours Classes – Certificates Available!
    The 12 Hours can be completed in two consecutive Saturdays. However, you can take up to 3 weeks to complete the course.
  • 18 Hours Classes – Certificates Available!
    The 18 Hours can be completed in three consecutive Saturdays. However, you can take up to 4 weeks to complete the course.

Anger Management Workbooks are available for purchase, but not required – $50 each.

Saturday:   7:30 AM – 1:30 PM
Fees: $15.00 per hour

Please call 281-477-9105 or visit http://www.ami-tx.com for additional information.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC
Anger Management & Domestic Violence Institute of Texas
www.ami-tx.com
http://www.dvi-tx.com

Self Awareness: The Foundation of Anger Management

It’s a well established theory anger is a secondary emotion; one usually experience emotions such as frustration, disappointment, and jealousy right before one becomes angry.

These emotions are generally based on some form of un-met need and/or a value one perceives to have been violated.

Most people seldom realize these primary emotions due to their low level of emotional self-awareness. Understanding emotional self-awareness, one of the five principals of emotional intelligence is essential in mastering anger control and fear control skills

According to Dr. Scott Williams, understanding your own feelings, what causes them, and how they impact your thoughts and actions is emotional self-awareness.  If you were once excited about your job but not excited now, can you get excited again?  To answer that question, it helps to understand the internal processes associated with getting excited.  That sounds simpler than it is.  Here’s an analogy: I think I know how my car starts–I put gas in the tank, put the key in the ignition, and turn the key.  But, my mechanic knows a lot more about what’s involved in getting my car started than I do–he knows what happens under the hood.  My mechanic is able to start my car on the occasions when I’m not because he understands the internal processes.  Similarly, a person with high emotional self-awareness understands the internal process associated with emotional experiences and, therefore, has greater control over them.

The Anger Management Institute of Texas utilizes the Anderson & Anderson ® curriculum; the workbooks contain exercises focusing on enhancing emotional intelligence, improving assertive communication, as well as behavior strategies for recognizing, dealing with, and managing anger and stress.

For additional information please call 281-477-9105 or visit our website http://www.ami-tx.com .

Anger Management Classes available 7 days a week in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Anger Management: A Lucartive Niche Market

Anger management is increasingly becoming one of the most sought after interventions worldwide. Anderson & Anderson receives requests daily from Human Resource Managers, Organizational Development Specialists, Employee Assistance Professionals as well as University Dean of Students requesting referral resources for their client populations.

As cut backs and downsizing occur in an environment of terrorist fears, employees, faculties and students are responding with fear, anxiety, depression and anger. These feelings often lead to tension in the workplace, home or educational environment. For businesses, the concern over workplace violence, sick day usage, work performance, liability, and productivity has caused a heightened sensitivity of the need to seek solutions. Voluntary and mandatory anger management as well as executive coaching is rapidly becoming the intervention of choice.

In colleges and Universities, there is an increase in tensions between students and faculty, faculty and faculty as well as between students. Traditional counseling and psychotherapy is expensive, time consuming and ineffective. Since anger is not a psychiatric disorder, psychotherapy is inappropriate and has simply not worked. Consequently, major universities are routinely making referrals to Anderson & Anderson® providers nationwide.

Another major source of requests for training and material is the Criminal Justice system. Probation departments, courts, jails and prisons are using anger management to teach skills in managing aggression and violence. The Canadian Bureau of Prisons has demonstrated in fifteen years of study that incarcerated defendants who are taught how to manage stress and anger using a cognitive behavior approach with client workbook show an 83% success rate. These skills are maintained when defendants are returned to their home communities. This longitudinal study reinforces the effectiveness of anger management.

The California State Board of Corrections has approved the Anderson & Anderson® curricula, training and client workbooks for use in jails, prisons as well as parole and probation departments in Bermuda, Cayman Islands, California. Arizona, Texas, Kansas and Nevada have also adopted this curriculum for use in its Corrections Departments.

Be Oltra, Next Generation is the Anderson & Anderson affiliate in Italy. Be Oltra provided Italian language dubbing for the Sony movie, Anger Management. In addition, they are offering anger management to Universities, prisons and businesses in Italy with considerable success.

Anger Management providers who are trained in the Anderson & Anderson® model and actually use the client workbooks can reasonably expect to receive referrals. Our internet marketing and domination of the anger management field provides credibility and branding to our providers and affiliates.

Currently, we are negotiating with a major Canadian based ITT Corporation with affiliates in 52 countries. This organization is interested in providing the Anderson & Anderson® model of intervention to its client companies worldwide. Naturally this will further enhance the number of referrals for all of our providers. With our increasing prominence, it is necessary for us to make certain that providers on our list are actually presenting our model as designed. Beginning, in February, we will begin contacting each provider who has not recently purchased our client workbooks. Providers who are not using our workbooks will be removed from our provider list. This is necessary to protect the credibility of this model.

By George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF, CEAP http://www.andersonservices.com

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a Certified Anderson & Anderson® Provider

Anger Management Classes available 7 days a week in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Anger Management: Assessing the Aftermath of Conflict

It is very important to have the proper approach in order to effectively resolve a conflict. But merely solving the conflict is not enough. It is also very important to recognize what valuable lessons you learned from the situation itself.

Below are 14 questions to help you recognize the source of the argument as well as how to learn from it. Ask yourself the following after your next conflict:

1. At what point did the conflict get out of control? Was it something that the other person said that offended me? Before the fight, was there tension that already existed between me and that person?

2. What did I learn from this experience?

3. What did I learn about sensitivities, both my own and the person that I had the conflict?

4. During the argument, how well did I respect, understand, listen, and calmly state my point of view?

5. How did I manage my anger? How bad was I hurt?

6. How did my adversary manage his anger? In what ways was he hurt?

7. Did either I or my adversary change our opinions and point of views? Were we able to handle our differences?

8. Did I make the mistake of finding this conflict valuable for letting off steam?

9. Did I learn something about myself during the argument?

10. Was I able to identify my conflict style? Do I tend to avoid conflict? Am I inclined to compromise? Do I tend to be a competitor?

11. Was I able to recognize my strategy (how I deal with conflict), and my “weapons” (my methods in which to attack, criticize, argue with my adversary).

12. What do I hope for my adversary to do differently next time to avoid experiencing another conflict?

13. What do I want and expect to do differently next time to avoid experiencing another conflict?

14. Was I able to come up with a creative solution to the very core issue of the conflict?

These 14 questions will give you the encouragement to further understand yourself. In addition, by being honest with yourself these questions can help you change your behavior when it comes to dealing with conflict in the future.

Human relations fail because people do not know how to handle differences. The greatest reward in assessing the aftermath of the conflict is that it improves and deepens relationships between two people.

By John Edmond

Anger Management Classes available 7 days a week in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Phases of Executive Coaching For Physicians

For those who are making referrals of physicians or other executive to executive coaching/anger management, it is useful to have an understanding of the coaching process in order to accurately explain to the potential coachee the four steps of the process.

The Anderson & Anderson Executive Coaching/Anger Management model includes the four phases which are described below:

First phase: Engagement and Contract. This phase involves the establishment of a viable working relationship and agreement about the nature of the coaching. Establishing a collaborative relationship is considered a necessary condition for the success of the coaching. Both the client and the coach must be motivated to participate in the coaching process.

Second phase: Comprehensive non psychiatric assessment. The three assessment instruments used in the Anderson & Anderson model are designed to determine the clients’ level of functioning in managing stress, anger, assertive communication and degrees of emotional intelligence.

Third phase: Action Plan and Implementation Strategies. A written action plan to address each deficit area with the goal to be achieved along with the methods and techniques for success are articulated during this phase. Implementing the coaching plan is the real core of the executive coaching process and, therefore, the longest phase during which various coaching interventions are initiated. Our Executive Coaching program includes a DVD, along with two client workbooks containing course content, exercises and quizzes to guide the participant in enhancing skills in the deficit areas.

Fourth phase: Post Tests, Progress and Outcomes. Ideally, an assessment continues throughout the coaching process, monitoring and evaluating the outcomes against the agreed-upon goals. In the Anderson & Anderson Coaching Executive coaching process, Post Tests occur after three and six months.

By George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF,CEAP http://www.andersonservices.com/

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes available 7 days a week in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Anger Management Institute of Texas’ Website Receives Recognition

WEGO’s team of expert researchers and community members has awarded Anger Management Institute of Texas,”Welcome to Anger Management Institute of Texas “, as a Recommended Resource

This signifies their recognition that “Welcome to Anger Management Institute of Texas” as one of the best resources for information on mental health on the web. They’re currently featuring it on their  Anger Management Tool Topic Page. 
 
WEGO Health’s mission is to identify, rank, and organize the most helpful health and wellness content on the Web, and make it easy to access by everyone.  Their mission is articulated nicely here.

Anger Management Classes available 7 days a week in Houston, Texas. 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Easy Anger Management Tips

 The first step in being able to learn effective anger management techniques is to recognize the situations that make you angry and your body’s warning signs of anger.
List things that can trigger your anger

Make a list of the things that often set off your anger (for example, running late for work and getting stuck in a traffic jam, your teenager leaving not helping out around the house or a co-worker blaming you for something you didn’t do). If you know ahead of time what makes you angry, you may be able to avoid these things or do something different when they happen.

Pay attention to the warning signs of anger in your body Notice the things that happen to your body that tell you when you are getting angry (for example, a pounding heart, flushed face, sweating, tense jaw, tightness in your chest or gritting your teeth).The earlier you can recognize these warning signs of anger, the more successful you will probably be at calming yourself down before your anger gets out of control.

Find anger management techniques that work for you

There are a number of different ways of managing anger and some strategies will suit you better than others. Here’s some simple ways to put an end to the vicious cycle of stress that anger can bring: Control your thinking

When you’re angry, your thinking can get exaggerated and irrational. Try replacing these kinds of thoughts with more useful, rational ones and you should find that this has an affect on the way you feel. For example, instead of telling yourself “I can’t stand it, it’s awful and everything’s ruined,” tell yourself “It’s frustrating, and it’s understandable that I’m upset about it, but it’s not the end of the world and getting angry is not going to fix it.” Psychologists call this type of thinking “self talk.”

Develop a list of things to say to yourself before, during and after situations in which you may get angry. It is more helpful if these things focus on how you are managing the situation rather than what other people should be doing.

Before:

“I’ll be able to handle this. It could be rough, but I have a plan.” “If I feel myself getting angry, I’ll know what to do.”

During:

“Stay calm, relax, and breathe easy.” “Stay calm, I’m okay, s/he’s not attacking me personally.” “I can look and act calm.”

After:

“I managed that well. I can do this. I’m getting better at this.” “I felt angry, but I didn’t lose my cool.”

Take time out

If you feel your anger getting out of control, take time out from a situation or an argument. Try stepping outside the room, or going for a walk. Before you go, remember to make a time to talk about the situation later when everyone involved has calmed down. During time out, plan how you are going to stay calm when your conversation resumes.

Use distraction

A familiar strategy for managing anger is to distract your mind from the situation that is making you angry. Try counting to ten, playing soothing music, talking to a good friend, or focusing on a simple task like polishing the car, doing the dishes, folding laundry or walking the dog.

Use relaxation techniques

Relaxation strategies can reduce the feelings of tension and stress in your body. Practice strategies such as taking long deep breaths and focusing on your breathing, or progressively working around your body and relaxing your muscles as you go.

Learn assertiveness skills

Assertiveness skills can be learnt through self-help books or by attending courses. These skills ensure that anger is channelled and expressed in clear and respectful ways. Being assertive means being clear with others about what your needs and wants are, feeling okay about asking for them, but respecting the other person’s needs and concerns as well and being prepared to negotiate.

Avoid using words like “never” or “always” (for example, “You’re always late!”), as these statements are usually inaccurate, make you feel as though your anger is justified, and don’t leave much possibility for the problem to be solved.

Try to acknowledge what is making you angry

Acknowledge that a particular issue has made you angry by admitting it to yourself and others. Telling someone that you felt angry when they did or said something is more helpful than just acting out the anger.

Make sure you think about who you express your anger to, and take care that you aren’t just dumping your anger on the people closest to you, or on people who are less powerful than you. For example, don’t yell at your partner, children, or dog when you are really angry with your boss.

Sometimes it can help to write things down. What is happening in your life? How do you feel about the things that are happening? Writing about these topics can sometimes help give you some distance and perspective and help you understand your feelings. Work out some options for changing your situation.

Rehearsing anger management techniques

Use your imagination to practice anger management strategies. Imagine yourself in a situation that usually sets off your anger. Imagine how you could behave in that situation without getting angry. Think about a situation where you did get angry. Replay the situation in your mind and imagine resolving the situation without anger.

Try rehearsing some anger management strategies with a friend. Ask them to help you act out a situation where you get angry, so that you can practice other ways to think and behave. Practice saying things in an assertive way.

How are thousands of people learning anger management techniques that bring instant results? enjoying an anger fre calmer, happier and more productive life? Michael Atma has created the ultimate stress relief resource for a calmer, happier, healthier and more productive life – now!

by Michael Atma

Anger Management Classes available 7 days a week in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert