Why Anger Assessments are Important


Anger is only an emotion. It is witnessed in the best of us and the worst of us. Experiencing anger certainly does not make us lesser human-beings.

 

If it’s only a feeling-an emotion, why do we let it take control of our lives?

 

Good Question. The answer though is not that simple. Anger may be an emotion but it is a complex emotion. This is because everyone does not experience and express anger in the same fashion. Some react immediately while others may go on a slow burn for days before exploding in a fit of temper. 

 

Displays of anger at work have become quite common place these days. Line workers are more prone to violent outbursts as compared to top level executives. In factories and manufacturing units, it’s not uncommon to stumble on workers sabotaging property and instigating strikes when their demands are not met. Higher level executives also have their fair share of anger related issues. These executives have deadlines to meet and responsibilities towards management. When things fail to go as planned, work pressure takes its toll and they sometimes react with hostility.

 

Domestic violence is a direct result of mismanaged and misplaced anger. Anger momentarily blinds and causes people to lash out at anything in front of them. “Angerholics” do not think twice before spewing their venom on their partners or even their children for that matter.

 

There are some people who come across as being angry all the time. Even, when things are apparently normal, they are simmering under the surface. The root cause may be traced to an unhappy childhood, low self-esteem, drug addiction and feelings of guilt and denial.

 

Anger Assessment: An anger assessment is necessary to gauge how far a person will go when angry. A properly designed assessment program will indicate how bad the anger is and the degree to which anger management is needed. It entails asking the participant to answer a few questions based on which certain conclusions are drawn. The questions are framed in such a way so as to judge whether a person is emotionally mature or faces mild to extreme anger issues.

 

Some typical anger assessment questions are:

·        How often do you get aggressive?

·        How often do you resort to violence like punching or assaulting someone?

·        Do insignificant things irritate you when angry?

·        Do you get abusive verbally or use expletives?

·        Do you make nasty and hurtful remarks when angry?

·        How long does it take for you to cool down?

·        Do you vent your temper on things other than your object of anger?

·        Have you hit your immediate boss or anyone else in authority?

·        Have you ever punched a cop?

 

Based on the answers to these questions, people are categorized as having mild, moderate or highly severe anger management concerns.

 

Anger Assessment and Anger Management: Anger assessment is the first step towards anger management. If the degree to which a person experiences anger and the extent to which he’ll go is measured, anger management can be directed more specifically. Since every individual is unique, customized anger management can be done for individual cases. Anger assessment judges the level of anger experienced and reactions to it. Anger management takes off from here. Judging how bad the situation really is helps focusing on finding a solution.

 

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

 

The Disruptive Physician and Emotionality

trainingDedication, commitment, investment…hard work and vision.  These are the givens.  The personality characteristics that help those seeking a career in medicine succeed, however, can also be the very same characteristics that can eventually undermine the practitioner’s workplace effectiveness and personal well-being. 

Most will enter training with an altruistic desire and vision to be of service, to make a meaningful contribution to others and to attain a sense of personal achievement and career satisfaction.  Our culture reinforces that vision.  Physicians are held in high regard, valued for their achievement and their contributions to the well-being of others. 

As in many such service careers, the vision of the young practitioner can drive and sustain the momentum of achievement.   Unfortunately, the rigors and realities of training and clinical practice can steadily obscure that original vision.  Physicians can find themselves so entrenched ‘in the trenches’ that survival, not vision, becomes the driving force in daily practice.  Many feel ‘locked in’ to move forward despite the personal toll and emotional costs.  As the dream subsides into an often harsh awakening, emotions can run high.  The original vision of service can recede behind fatigue, a workplace with limited resources, the constraints of externally imposed regulation and the complications of finding ethical balance in a reality of limited control and legal liability.

It is not easy to accommodate the erosion of one’s vision.  And, it is not easy in the demands of daily practice to maintain a visionary perspective on just what this chosen profession is really all about.  The bigger picture, the personal stake and mission in this work, can be hard to keep in focus.  At times, the physician can grieve the loss of that perspective feeling more that being on call, charting, doing rounds and paying malpractice premiums win out in the daily grind. 

Collegial relationships are valuable in renewing perspective, re-envisioning the bigger picture and rejuvenating the physician who has been in the trenches for long stretches of time.  The realities of daily practice, however, more often require the physician to practice in relative isolation even in a workplace shared with other physicians.  Colleagues who are equally busy with the demands of their own daily practice are not always available to provide quality support in decision-making about patient care, in peer supervision or personal support.  Many physicians will find themselves, in such work conditions, having lost the bigger picture of why they are working so hard.  Such a loss of perspective can cause resentment and emotional depletion.  Emotionally-driven decisions and behaviors that even further complicate the stress of daily practice become more likely.  Unable to gain perspective in the rush and demands of daily work, the overworked and under-supported physician might find that workplace behaviors have begun to deteriorate into emotionality rather than professionalism.

Anger Management Institute of Texas’ Executive Coaching Program is utilized by management of accredited hospital/organizations for physicians displaying disruptive behaviors in the workplace.

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Disruptive Physicians and the Emotional Toll of Medical Practice

Many physicians work in a demanding professional climate fraught with looking-for-perspective3long hours, rapidly paced schedules and, most often, an overwhelming clinical responsibility.  As a backdrop to these daily rigors, the onus of legal liability along with professional isolation, will, over the long haul, exponentially compound the emotional toll of a medical practice.

While these are powerful dynamics in the work-a-day world of the physician, they can also become corrosive forces in the private lives of physicians.  Opportunities for social support, collegial relationships outside the workplace, participation in family life, recreation and self-care activities can take a costly backburner to the daily practice of medicine.  The physician is consistently challenged to find a balance in daily living that will support and rejuvenate the ability to practice and practice well.

Training does not prepare physicians for the balanced management of a practice.  Medical school does not focus upon the well-being the physician.  Conversely, training more frequently reinforces the denial of personal needs in various ways. Early on the career path, the physician is expected to work to full capacity even when physically and emotionally spent.  Additionally, often victims of the nonprofessional behavior of superiors themselves, younger physicians are soon initiated into the professional world of power and control.

Professional role models often expose the physician-in-training to their own emotional distress in the workplace.  Emotionally-driven behavior and poor, even abusive interpersonal behaviors, are not uncommon ‘lessons’ for the student or resident.  Superiors can model powerful and self-sabotaging workplace behavior that the younger physician internalizes. Students often learn early on that those in charge can behave in marginal or even abusive ways to those with ‘lesser rank’.

The training of a physician is lengthy and arduous.  It takes place, throughout its course, within the rank and file of a rigid hierarchy.  The need to please superiors in order to be successful is always front and center.  Moreover, medical training is a difficult and costly investment.  While the majority of physicians will begin practice in deep financial debt, the emotional investment of training is deep as well.  Consequently, young physicians will endure much to succeed.  Unfortunately, in a profession that demands so much over the long haul, and in the confines of a work day, many will struggle to cope with the emotional costs of practice while their training has often ill-prepared them to do so.

Anger Management Institute of Texas’ Executive Coaching Program is utilized by management of accredited hospital/organizations for physicians displaying disruptive behaviors in the workplace.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert 
 

Disruptive Physicians: Evaluating Your Own Interactional Style – Passivity and Passive Aggression

retreating-to-my-own-world_jpgPassivity and passive aggression in medical practice may actually be one and the same.  A passive physician can be disruptive to effective patient care and the performance of the work team.  An ‘absent’ physician can also greatly increase the risk of error and adverse incidents.  Passive behaviors such as not communicating pertinent clinical information through timely or thorough charting, not seeking consultations, not answering pages or calls promptly or at all are some of the ways in which physicians can undermine effective patient care.
 
These types of behavior, while not open displays of verbal abuse or aggression, also fall under concerns raised by JCAHO in their Behaviors That Undermine a Culture of Safety.  Sentinel Event Alert Bulletin:  Issue 40. July 9 2008.  It is significant that JCAHO also considers the passive physician to be disruptive.  The bulletin states:

 “Intimidating and disruptive behaviors include overt actions such as verbal outbursts and physical threats, as well as passive activities such as refusing  to perform assigned tasks or quietly exhibiting uncooperative attitudes during routine activities.”

JCAHO now recommends core competencies for the credentialing of medical staff.  These recommendations cite the need for physicians to demonstrate competencies “including interpersonal skills and professionalism” in the work environment.  Refusal of privileges by credentialing committees, and administrative action against already hired physicians, could apply equally to the passive physician and the more openly aggressive one.

It is likely that the passive physician is responding to the same stressors as the aggressive physician, but that individual coping styles and personality structures account for the dissimilar presentations.  Some individuals, across professions, will act out when chronically stressed while others will express themselves indirectly and in a more internalized way. 

Passive physicians would do well to repair their clinical demeanor by moving from their end of the expressive continuum toward assertiveness as well.  Increased engagement with teammates in person and through call begins to build relationships.  Re-affirming the importance of one’s role in the clinical setting can help increase motivation to communicate one’s knowledge through notes and consultations with team mates.  Increased interaction with team mates will help foster a sense of being needed and having a vital contribution to make in the clinical setting.
 
If the physician’s withdrawal from the clinical setting is reactive to being overwhelmed by the team’s approach then more proactive interaction will help ‘teach’ and ‘train’ the team members to communicate and interact with the physician in supportive ways.  Passive physicians will have to rehearse assertion skills in order to convey what would help diminish workplace stress and facilitate a better, more comfortable alliance with other team members.

Anger Management Institute of Texas’ Executive Coaching Program is utilized by management of accredited hospital/organizations for physicians displaying disruptive behaviors in the workplace.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert