Domestic Violence vs. Anger Management

Domestic Violence can happen to anybody, anytime. As opposed to general perception, it doesn’t affect any particular type of community or family. The rich and the poor have become victims of domestic violence. No matter what your standing in society is you could be a victim of domestic violence.

Though, the perpetrator is most often a man, in a few cases women also are responsible for domestic violence. Domestic violence takes place between married couples, un-married couples and people in homosexual relationships. Domestic violence is not an isolated incident that takes place. It is generally characterized by patterns of boisterous behavior, abuse, intimidation and control.

Domestic violence is a legally punishable offense. Criminal violence includes physical and sexual abuse. Verbal abuse is not punishable under law but can nevertheless have an appalling effect on the victim. Children are the worst sufferers in the entire situation. They end up with severe trauma and psychological scars that may last a lifetime.

The story of domestic violence in most occasions is the saga of control and power. It is about one person wielding power over the other. Many times it is also associated with anger related behavioral disorders. In many cases the victim is kept behind closed doors and not allowed to communicate with anyone outside the home. In extreme cases he/she is not allowed to even venture outside the house or call anyone. Children live in fear and experience difficulties sleeping and become withdrawn. More often than not children are aware of the abuse but can’t fathom what to do about it.

Domestic violence is all around us. When we witness domestic violence we are often under the notion that they are personal issues and we ought not to interfere. This is a wrong stance to take. We are not aware of how many innocent lives we could have saved had we made that call at the right time. The next time you come across domestic violence don’t look the other way. Offer to help or at least contact someone who can. You never know if someday you may need help too.

Sufferers who put up with years of domestic violence usually have nowhere else to go. They are dependent on the abusers for financial support and may have kids to consider. Though, alcohol and substance abuse worsen the problem of domestic violence they are not considered to be the causes for it. Generally the abusers have underlying issues of inferiority complex, insecurity, low self-esteem, pent-up rage and frustration. Little things drive them over the edge to become full time wife-bashers.

If you are a victim of domestic violence don’t hesitate to seek help. Keep phone numbers of the police and local volunteer groups handy. If you have children try moving them to a safe haven like a friend or family’s place. Keep a cell-phone nearby at all times just in case an emergency occurs.

Domestic Violence and Anger Management: Anger Management is frequently used as a tool to curb Domestic Violence. But many victims of abuse claim that this doesn’t help since domestic violence is not an isolated crime of passion that occurs when anger takes over. Rather, it is premeditated and planned over a period of time to control and manipulate the victim. It has more to do with power and less to do with anger. Batters should be referred to a Batters Intervention & Prevention Program (BIPP) vs. Anger Management Classes; however more and more courts are sending them to both programs.

For information about Batters Intervention & Prevention Program (BIPP) visit http://www.dvi-tx.com and for Anger Management Classes visit http://www.ami-tx.com .

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Study Reveals the Angriest Americans

VAndrea Thompson
Senior Writer
LiveScience.com

Anger is more likely among the young, those with children at home, and the less educated, a new study finds.

A national survey of 1,800 Americans aged 18 and older questioned participants on how and when they feel angry in order to build “a broader social portrait of anger in the United States,” said study researcher Scott Schieman, now at the University of Toronto.

These angry emotions range from mild annoyance to yelling and feelings of outrage.

While anger is a normal human emotion, it could be detrimental if you hold on to it too long. And those who express their anger might actually live longer than those who keep it bottled in, one study found.

The results of the survey, conducted in 2005 and to be published next year, showed several key connections to anger.

For one, people under 30 experienced anger of all forms or intensities more frequently than did older adults. This was mainly due to the fact that young people are more likely to be affected by three core stressors that can trigger angry feelings, Schieman said:

Time pressures
Economic hardship
Interpersonal conflict at the workplace

Time pressures had the strongest link to anger, especially low-grade versions termed “feelings of annoyance,” the study found.

Those who were under financial strain tended to report higher levels of anger, a connection that could be particularly important in today’s flagging economy, Schieman noted. The financial influence tended to be stronger among women and younger adults.

Having children was also associated with angry feelings and behaviors, such as yelling, particularly in women, the survey found.

“There’s obviously a lot of joys and benefits that come with parenthood,” but other aspects of parenting, such as having to discipline a misbehaving child, can cause feelings of anger and annoyance, Schieman said.

Those with fewer years of education were also more likely to report feelings of anger and were less likely to respond proactively in a situation that made them angry (for example, talking about what made them angry).

“It underscores the power of getting more education,” Schieman said. Education has been linked to feeling more self-control, which could be why those with more education tend to manage their anger more proactively, he told LiveScience.

Schieman’s findings will be detailed in a chapter of the forthcoming International Handbook of Anger, to be released in January 2010.

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert
Houston, Texas