Problems Associated with Anger: Anger Management Classes

If anger becomes an emotion that occurs too often, is felt too intensely or causes some inappropriate behavior (verbal, physical), then anger is a problem.  Additionally, problematic anger can have a great deal of impact upon health and physical well-being.

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Anger naturally causes a rise in heart rate and blood pressure, even when anger problems are not present, however, individuals who have chronic anger, or recurring intense anger in episodes, can have high pulse rates and high blood pressure frequently and for prolonged periods.  This can result in serious medical issues such as hypertension and heart disease. 

Furthermore, escalated levels of strain upon the body such as those that occur in problematic anger can, over the long run, create other multiple physical problems that are experienced as intense bodily discomfort daily.  Some of the physical consequences of chronic anger must be managed medically to prevent, for example, the extreme problems associated with heart disease and hypertension. 

Also, ulcers, other digestive problems, headaches and chronic muscle tension throughout the body are common for people with anger management problems.  Some people with chronic and problematic anger will have a lowered resistance to infection as chronic stress wears down the immune system.  Complications of ‘adrenalin dumping’ (anger creates surges of adrenalin that ready the body for fight and survival mode) can seriously affect the nervous system and lead to other debilitating conditions.  It is not uncommon for individuals with anger management problems to have a variety of physical problems that, in themselves, can wear down the ability to use appropriate coping skills.

While anger problems will naturally have negative consequences upon others as the individual interacts in problematic ways, the biology of anger is often a silent and accumulating, serious issue for those with anger management problems.  Often the other negative consequences of problematic anger (social, legal, occupational) are much more apparent and the physical issues—many of which can be serious—are discovered much later.  Anger management Classes can be a significant investment in one’s own health and well-being. 

For additional information about anger management services please call 281-477-9105 or visit www.ami-tx.com.

Anger Management Classes in Houston, TX

Gregory A. Kyles, LPC, CEAP, PHR, CAMF
Anger Management & Domestic Violence Institute of Texas
www.ami-tx.com
www.dvi-tx.com

Need Help With Your Anger?

When was the last time you felt really angry? Has it been a month, week, a day, yesterday, an hour ago or do you just feel angry all the time?

 

Anger is not tangible. It’s not something you can get hold of with your bare hands and toss away. Anger may be a symptom of stress, depression, childhood memories or feelings of low self-esteem. Some people actually take a perverse pleasure in anger because possibly it’s the only time they feel in control of the situation. Anger gives them a high and a sensation of power especially when people are terrified of their tempers.

 

Anger is not confined to a particular type of person. Everybody gets angry at sometime or the other. However, the responses and reactions to anger vary from person to person. Why is it that some people rave and rant when angry and others are able to maintain some semblance of composure even if boiling inside? Well, a lot of it depends on our family background, the company we keep and our ability to adjust to everyday stress and pressures. If we come from a household where people scream and yell to make a point, it’s quite possible we’ll end up doing the same if faced with a difficult situation. This is because we subconsciously pick up behavioral patterns and traits from our immediate surroundings. 

 

Impulsive people are more prone to expressing anger rather violently. They act before they think and repent in leisure. Have you ever had a boss who flings files when he’s angry? Perhaps, you’re one of those employees who everybody avoids because your temper scares the living daylights out of them. Does your partner leave town each time you show signs of throwing a fit? If you find yourself flying off the handle at the least sign of provocation, you might want to consider getting help with anger.

 

Help With Anger: If you want to quit interrupting your progress at work and at the domestic front because of bouts of rage, seek help with anger. Anger destroys and devastates. People have recognized the need to start anger management programs to deal with anger related issues. Numerous local social and volunteer groups have begun these programs. They are conducted in groups or on a one-to-one basis. Group therapy involves people facing similar issues expressing feelings, thoughts and experiences. Hypnosis is also advocated by many therapists as a means to control anger. If you don’t want to seek help with your local groups, going online is also a solution. Several online anger management courses are available if you’re not comfortable speaking to people about your issues. Yoga is also a great way to de-stress and unwind as it follows the principles of calm and composure in adverse circumstances. Reading self-help books covering anger related behavioral issues can help to an extent.

 

Help with Anger through Stress Management: There is no escape from stress. However, we can’t let stress build up to a point that anger or even rage takes over. Stress management is closely related to anger management. If you can learn to manage stress effectively, anger related issues get resolved automatically. Stress can be managed effectively through a combination of techniques like laughter therapy, meditation, listening to soothing music, watching television and going on a vacation with family and friends. We can certainly minimize what we can’t eliminate altogether. Minimizing stress through successful stress management techniques is a step towards managing and controlling anger.

 

 Effective stress management skills can be learned in an anger management program, for more information visit http://www.ami-tx.com.

 

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

 

Economic Crises Fuels Stress and Anger

One of the unfortunate consequences of the tragedy of 9/11 was a nationwide increase in the incidence of anger, stress, PTSD, depression, anxiety and substance abuse. Research conducted by the Rand Corporation and the Neuropsychiatric Institute at UCLA Medical Center indicated that the impact of this disaster on vulnerable persons was the same, independent of the proximity to New York or Washington, D.C.

The current worldwide economic crisis is having the same impact as 9/11. Mental health providers, certified anger management providers and family medicine practitioners in the U.S., Canada and Europe are reporting an increase in all of the disorders mentioned above.

Stress is so widespread that even clergy and the faith based community is opting to have select members of their congregations trained and certified in anger management, stress, management, communication and emotional intelligence.

The San Francisco the Pubic Defender, Jeff Adachi, has concluded that the role of the public defender should also include violence prevention and anger management for at-risk youth.

Stress is a common system that serves to create or exacerbate Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, anger, anxiety, depression and substance abuse.

Unlike anxiety, depression, substance abuse and PTSD, anger is not a mental or emotional disorder and is not responsive to counseling, psychotherapy or psychotropic medication. In fact, the American Psychiatric Association maintain that unhealthy anger is a lifestyle issue and therefore not a subject of interest to the APA.

The most appropriate intervention for problem anger, stress, aggressive communication and rage is anger management. Certified Anger Management Facilitators are trained to provide non-psychiatric assessments designed to determine a clients’ level of functioning in recognizing and managing anger, recognizing and managing stress, styles of communication and emotional intelligence. Following the assessment, the client is given a workbook and skill enhancement assignment in all of the areas mentioned above.

For a list of Certified Anger Management Facilitators, click here.

By George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF http://www.andersonservices.com

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a Certified Anderson & Anderson® Provider

Anger Management Classes and Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.
Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Learn to Manage Your Anger

Feelings and emotions just happen to us. We cannot rid ourselves of them. All we can do is control the way they influence our lives. The same rule applies to anger. We cannot wish it away but we can manage the way it powers our lives and those around us.

 

Anger ranges from anything between a mild irritation to a full blown temper tantrum. When we are angry we experience a rush of adrenaline to our veins. Certain people also experience a tightening of the jaw, gnashing of teeth and clenching of fists. These are some of our physical responses to anger. Anger, like any other emotion is neither good nor bad. It’s just there and it’s something we need to deal with. The problem occurs when we find it difficult or impossible to manage or regulate our anger.

 

Being cool and calm when faced with a storm is imperative especially at the workplace. The equations at an office change daily. One day sees you as the blue eyed boy at work. The next day you may be pulled up for something that isn’t your fault. Everyday brings in its wake new challenges and struggles. We get angry because we decide that certain things are unfair. But then not everything in life is fair.

 

Managing anger is an indicator of your ability to deal with stress and pressure. Employees have lost promotions because they failed to deal with a crisis in a dignified manner. Managers who fly off the handle when faced with a calamity fail to retain their staff. Nobody likes to work in an organization where tempers are on a short fuse and everybody’s screaming all the time. Marriages disintegrate because of anger issues. Domestic violence is on the rise thanks to this most primitive of all human emotions. 

 

Managing Anger: Desperate situations call for desperate measures. If you find yourself raising your hand each time you feel angry you need to seek help. Now!!!

 

Managing anger is crucial for your mental and physical well-being. Many experts say that the first step to managing anger is recognizing it as it occurs. When we are angry we need to acknowledge it. Next, we need to understand why we are angry. Is it something that we can control? Has something fallen short of our expectations? Do we feel that something is unfair? Once you take the time to understand the reason for your anger you will be able to see things in a new light. Then all you need to do is to shift the focus away from your anger and concentrate on finding a solution to the problem. By the time you’ve done this you’ll find your anger fading away. What’s more you can give yourself brownie points for tackling the situation without bursting at the seams.

 

Relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, yoga and meditation have been advocated by many researchers to manage anger. Enrolling in an anger management class is also an option for those who experience violent fits of rage. Expressing feelings and stating needs are good exercises to release pent-up frustrations.

 

Managing Anger through Assertive Communication: Assertive communication involves sticking to your convictions while communicating without being offensive. When we are angry we say things that we wouldn’t have said otherwise. Many of these things hurt the people who are close to us. You have to learn to convey thoughts without appearing rude and opinionated. Being angry does not give us the right to fire expletives and attack the opposite person. An aggressive communicator will create arguments rather than find solutions. Passive communicators fail to stand up for themselves and come across as weak and timid. An assertive communicator on the other hand will not let himself be bullied nor will bully someone else. Assertiveness is the key to expressing anger in an effective manner. Hence, managing anger through assertive communication has become the need of the hour. 

 

 Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert


Assertive Communication Tips for Those Who Manage Others

  1. Be Civil: Speak honestly without meanness, viciousness or attack.
  2. Be empathetic and positive: Emphasize outcome and solutions. Choose your words to elevate and  empower your employees. Examine problems and hold your employers and yourself accountable, not  for blame, but for finding solutions.
  3. Speak clearly: Be straightforward, direct, and open.
  4. Listen carefully: Listen to others more than you speak. Listen as though you will be tested on understanding their words.
  5. Be honest: Speak with precision, exactness, and adherence to facts. Be balanced in your use of facts. Observe contextual correctness. Be informative and substantive.
  6. Keep and maintain awareness of the following perspectives: yours, theirs, and that of a neutral party.

The above skills can be practiced and enhanced over time, and they will increase the participants’ overall emotional intelligence while reducing the potential for conflict.

By George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF, CEAP http://www.andersonservices.com/

 “Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson provider.”

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles

Angry Employees in the Workplace

We spend a major portion of our lives at work. No job comes with a stress-free tag. If we want to work we have to accept the stress, pressures and responsibilities associated with it. In simple words, you can’t have your cake and eat it too. The stress and pressure we face at work often gives way to frustration and anger.

 

No organization can function without manpower. Employees form the heart and soul of any organization. A company with a dynamic workforce can climb heights never scaled before. In contrast, a company which continually finds itself the victim of strikes and lockouts may be forced to shut down. Therefore, it can be said that “The Employee Maketh the Organization. 

 

An angry employee can create havoc in the organization. Angry employees have been known to get violent, damage company property, destroy valuable records and even reveal important trade secrets to the competition. They are found at every level of the hierarchy beginning from line workers to top level executives. Therefore, in present times companies are coming up with ways to deal with this tricky problem. Managers play a crucial rule in resolving issues related to unruly employees.

 

Dealing with an Angry Employee: When an employee expresses anger it is extremely necessary to tackle it immediately. Managers have to devote some time to this exercise. This exhibits concern for the employee and his feelings. Procrastination can often result in the employee getting out of hand and creating a crisis situation.

 

Sizing up the manner in which angry employees deal with their co-workers may give management valuable insight on how to control the situation. 

 

For employees who are always boiling under the surface, anger management classes may be a good idea to prevent them from harming themselves and causing trouble at work. Managers should allow employees to express their grievances without interrupting them.  Interruptions cause strife and may end up creating unnecessary diversions from the main subject. Active listening by managers conveys to the employee that the management is concerned and willing to be objective.

It is imperative to have proper procedures in place for addressing employee grievances. There should be a box or a register of complaints that disgruntled employees can use to make management aware of their problems.

 

Preferably, the issue should be tackled in private. Many employees have reservations about opening up in front of their colleagues. If the employee is enraged and wants to go head-to-head in public then use tact and diplomacy to deal with him.

 

Anger Management for the Angry Employee: Managers have to be cognizant of the signs of angry employees in the workforce. The early symptoms will include regular late-coming, absenteeism, tardiness and back-biting. Once these signs are recognized, immediate action must be taken. Rather than reprimanding and humiliating the employee, management should make immediate arrangements to invest in Anger Management programs to enable employees cope with their stress and anger related issues. The organization should review its culture and make time for interacting with employees through planning of picnics and parties quarterly or half-yearly. Intermingling with employees in informal settings creates goodwill and understanding. Managing anger among employees is a pre-requisite to boosting their morale and enhancing productivity.

 

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

 

The Many Faces Of Anger

Having over thirty years experience as a psychotherapist, I have seen anger expressed in many of its forms, by omission and commission. Usually we have a way of expressing anger that is our signature, that is a way of being angry that we resort to over and over again, when we are in conflict. Habits have power because usually, we are unaware and we react unconsciously or automatically. Think for instance of where you place your tooth-brush. Every morning you reach in the same direction, without conscious thought unless it has been moved. Moving it breaks the automatic habit, as you become aware and notice you have to reach in a different direction. Many of our daily routines are similar response, i.e. automatic.

Like feelings in general, anger in and of itself is not good or bad. Its just a feeling. Feelings well up in us, as urges to go to the bathroom well up, without conscious invitation. It’s what you do with the feelings that will make a difference in the quality of your life and how it affects those near and dear. Most of us do not know, how to express anger appropriately, we’ve never been taught. Anger is feared, denied, projected and denounced. Often people associate any expression of anger with the extreme end of the spectrum, that of violence. Often and especially in relationships, it is the inability to express anger properly, that can escalate into violence.

On an anger spectrum; at one end we see irritability, grumpiness, negativity, criticism, resentment and judgemental behavior. These are milder forms of anger, but anger nonetheless. Our society seems to be more tolerant of the lesser forms, and our family conditioning allows it. Maybe because it is so prevalent, it is not addressed for what it really is, inappropriate anger. In the middle, is anger that has less intensity and is more amenable to appropriate expression. As it moves towards the other side, we encounter greater intensity as rage, fury, indignation and wrath. These levels of anger indicate on some level, a loss of control, a level of destructiveness verging on madness and violence. Wrath often implies not only rage and moral indignation but also a desire to punish. So where are you on this spectrum? Generally every individual has a troublesome spot. I read a quote from a Master who lived in the mountains. He answered several of life’s hard questions for the inquirer without hesitation. When asked how to handle anger, he broke his walking stick in half and bellowed “Do you think I’d be living alone in this deserted place if I had the answer to that?” Sooner or later we all have to come down from the mountain, and deal with fellow humans in the market place. Someone is invariably going to step on our toe, …. it!!

As a clinician, except for violent people, who take an extreme position and I very seldom work with, it’s the “nice nice’ anger avoiders, or deniers that give me the most trouble. If you are not willing or able to become aware of how you act out or project your anger, its like pulling teeth. They deny their anger, or fear it and fear it in others. They are also more likely to project it onto others. Not me, but them. Often avoiders have since childhood pushed down any version of angry feelings and may not be able to identify how it reveals itself in their lives. Maybe in childhood they were afraid to express, or lived in a violent home where an individual expressing could lead to violence. Nobody helped them differentiate violence from normal levels of dissatisfaction.

Sometimes it’s a woman living the “Christian Way”, who has mistakenly misinterpreted assertiveness and personal power, as aggressive, and non Christian. This is a hard nut to crack. One woman with the above profile, had Bible quote answers for many things including “turning the other cheek”. She however loved to attend boxing matches, and football games. She was videoed by her son, yelling “kill him, kill him” when she got fired up at these public spectator sports. Monday morning she was back to her “other cheek” way. She was unable to connect the dots as to how she projected her denied rage onto others. Her three children felt unheard, and experienced having no permission to express anything that wasn’t sweetness and light in her presence. When they grew to young adulthood, they limited their contact with her. She asked over and over “why are you upset with me?” “I haven’t done anything” She couldn’t express her own anger, and caused her children and others about her to feel guilty when they had their feelings. This mother was in fact a crazy maker, and it was sane of the children to keep their distance. She controlled others and frustrated them with avoidance, forgetting, being self righteous, thwarting plans, being late, etc. This behavior is so nebulous, one can’t get it out of the vapors, and make sense of it. You feel the disconnect with reality, but its hard for the average person to put a finger on exactly what is going on. Even in treatment such people usually have to be in a life altering crisis, to surrender their mask or ego, long enough to see the cracks in their cosmic egg.

I’m much prefer to work with anger that is available. Sometimes it is not pretty, its down right toxic, however its more available for exploration and change, than the suppressed and the denied. Anger is passion which indicates there is energy available for work if a person is ready to change. It is a big “if” due to the fact some people are addicted to anger. In the moment of their explosion, they feel powerful and for others it is a “rush” a high, that makes them feel at least temporarily more alive. The habit of anger then feeds the addiction as they get a surge of adrenalin and other feel good hormones. At this point it becomes more than a bad habit, its emotional excitement. You know of people who create some drama when life evens out. For people who rely on their anger in this way, the intense feelings keep their life from being dull, because they haven’t learned other ways of experiencing personal power.

You and I know that daily we rub up against situations that can if we allow it will trigger our anger. As matter of fact if we reacted to every opportunity to become angry, we’d be constantly angry. How about people who carry a well of shame, a high level of sensitivity and low self esteem. The slightest criticism sets off all three of the above stated characteristics. It can become explosive and blaming as well as projected on to whomever gets in their way. Usually their buttons have been pushed and inside of the raging adult is a child possessed, feeling vulnerable and out of control. Road rage is such an example. “How dare you cut me off, as others cut me off in the past, and I am justified in my rage toward you and a wanting to hurt you.” Of course all of this isn’t thought out, it a reaction to what is smoldering in the persons unconscious. The evidence of what is in the unconscious is the menancing, excessive, out of proportion , out of control behavior.

Some people suffer from black and white thinking, failing to be flexible enough to include others who are different. This concrete way of looking at a the world is quite prevalent in children until the age of reason. Some people get stuck at this level of development, and have a simplistic view of the world. This group spews moralistic anger towards others, when those others have broken the rules. Its as if they have a patent on what is right in the world and in order to protect it, they make others wrong. The offenders are labeled by this self-righteous group as bad, evil, wicked, sinful and deserve to be punished. So if one is different from the tribe, or from the church group, one may be harshly judged. It is interesting at times to look at the lives of the judges of how others should be. The ridigity of the frame they put around how others should live, is often frightening. What is more frightening is that this kind of thinking and anger is very prevalent in out society, at every level, from the highest offices to the person in the street. Such people claim moral superiority.

Hate happens when a person doesn’t resolve anger and allows no window of compassion or forgiveness to enter. Its really a hardened anger when one person decides that another person in totally wrong or evil or both. Its usually the cause of ongoing rumination, in the hater, who despises the offender and won’t let go or soften towards him or her. Sometimes the hater experiences secondary gain by seeing themselves as innocent and a victim.

You may see yourself in one or more of the examples I have given. You may wonder if you are able to change a life long habit of this nature. The first step is to become aware of what you do and how you do it. If you have an intention and willingness to change the way you express anger, it is certainly doable. Next time I’ll start with tools to address different modes of anger and the problems it causes in your life.

By Laura B. Young, LMFT http://www.LifeResourceCenter.net

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert