Disruptive Anger in the Workplace

The workplace is a melting point of people from different backgrounds, cultures and communities. Conflicts and differences of opinion are bound to occur. Add to that deadlines, work pressures and responsibilities and you get an entire workplace drama.

Newspapers frequently enumerate stories of employees going over the edge and shooting their colleagues or destroying company property. Ex-employees turn out to be spiteful and reveal confidential information to competitors. Some retaliate by wiping out years of company data and wrecking back-up files.

Manpower is a resource that has to be handled with care. Rough handling can be highly detrimental to the morale and productivity of the organization as a whole.

Workplace anger is experienced at all levels beginning from line staff and ending with executives and managers. However, it has been observed that lower levels of the hierarchy react more violently as compared to higher level executives. Perhaps, this is due to lack of proper training and orientation. Top executives on the other hand get more exposure to soft skills and communication programs. Prompting strikes and damaging property is more frequent among factory workers and daily wage earners. Executives retaliate differently. They may resort to back-biting, manipulation, intimidation and spite to release their resentment. It’s difficult to say which is the lesser of the two evils: getting violent or acting malicious.

Both are detrimental to the overall work environment. While violence is dangerous to lives and property, silent sufferance creates a negative atmosphere and dampens morale.

Reasons for Workplace Anger: Listed below are of the common reasons for anger at the workplace:

 Leaves not granted
 Regular overtime at the workplace
 No appreciation for good performance
 Promotions awarded to “yes men” as opposed to good performers
 Salary hikes not approved
 Overly critical supervisors or managers
 Partiality towards certain employees
 Termination of employment
 
Steps to curb Workplace Anger: Managers should be cognizant of the first signs of aggression. Absenteeism, late-coming, tardiness and deterioration in performance are some warning signals.
• Organizations should invest in Anger Management Programs at regular intervals to enable employees to express feelings and release pent-up emotions.
• One-to-one sessions with employees should take place regularly even when no problems are apparent. This helps prevent any lurking anger issues that may blow up later.
• Active listening and conversations in informal settings should be encouraged to make people feel at ease and open up.
• Proper systems for complaints and grievances must be established. Every complaint must be dealt with within a specified time frame.
• If an employee has to be terminated, it has to be done as civilly as possible. They should not be made to feel small and humiliated.

Stress Management to control Workplace Anger: Most of our stress is associated with work. Work pressure is on the rise. We are expected to be faster, brighter and more efficient than we already are. A disappointment with our job leads to depression and anger. Hence, controlling stress helps in controlling workplace anger. Being on cordial terms with our colleagues and superiors helps minimize stress at work. It’s not possible to be on good terms with everybody at the workplace. However, even a couple of supportive co-workers can prevent work from becoming a living hell.

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

How Do I Know if I Need Anger Management Classes?

anger2There are many ways to know if you need an anger management class, but only a few examples are listed here.  If you are not sure if you need an anger management class, consult a professional and get an anger management evaluation.

Some indications that you have an anger management problem are that you are controlling, use intimidation or manipulation, feel chronic hostility, have frequent interpersonal conflicts, or are known by others to be an angry employee, an angry boss or angry spouse.  If you are questioning whether your anger is problematic, the following questions may help you better decide:

  • Do I use anger in the workplace?
  • Do I have trouble expressing feelings other than anger?
  • Do I engage in angry behaviors to the point of harassment or abuse?
  • Do I confuse assertiveness with anger?
  • Have I ever thought that I need help to manage my anger?
  • Have I been told that I use intimidation or manipulation in relationships?
  • Have I been told that I am controlling?
  • Do I find myself blowing up in times of stress?
  • Do I have chronic stress?
  • Do I do property damage, make threats, get into physical fights, and yell?
  • Do I find myself focusing on things, situations and people and becoming angry?
  • Do I find myself interrupting others, becoming impatient, not able to listen?
  • Do I resist seeking compromise, or coming to an honest compromise, when there is conflict?
  • Do I have trouble stating my needs and become resentful when others do not meet them?
  • Do I have effective techniques for stress management?

These are some of the questions that can help you decide if you may need anger management classes.  The professional who will conduct an anger management assessment will ask similar questions to help you determine if anger management classes can decrease your stress, lower anger levels, improve your coping skills in everyday life, improve your relationships, and better equip you to meet your own personal goals. If you have problematic anger, anger management classes will help you in all these areas by increasing your emotional intelligence—your awareness of emotional states, and your knowledge of how to manage them appropriately.  As your emotional intelligence increases through anger management classes, you will find that many, many areas of your life improve.  Anger is a natural emotion, but what we do with anger can make our lives unmanageable and problematic or can create a life in which we are more successful and less stressed.

An anger management assessment will identify your current emotional intelligence—what you know about emotions in yourself and others, how to express emotions appropriately and how to manage them successfully.  Anger management classes will increase emotional intelligence giving you the tools you need to be less stressed, in more satisfying relationships, manage your workplace experience more effectively and, overall, improve your daily coping and performance.

It would most helpful if the anger management class curriculum focuses on anger management, stress management, assertive communication skills, and emotional intelligence.

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Anger Management and Assertive Communication

A relationship is not always a walk in the park. More often than not it is fraught with stress,anxiety and apprehension. This happens because two individuals in a relationship are constantly changing and growing with time.

 
The beginning of a relationship is superficial. Partners are at their best and all flaws are concealed. As they become comfortable with one another, all character flaws come to the surface and they start behaving like the people they really are.
 
Anger has become a cause for concern in many relationships. Wife beating, verbal abuse and temper tantrums are prevalent in many broken homes and marriages. Anger kills marriages and destroys lives.
 
Communication is the foundation stone of any relationship. No relationship can survive without communication. Relationships fail when there is a breakdown of communication between the partners. When we are angry, our thinking process becomes hazy and we sometimes raise our voices and even our fists.
 
The worst part about anger is that we tend to vent it on people we love the most. This is because we think the person isn’t going anywhere and therefore we make him/her an unwilling recipient for the worst of our tempers and frustrations. When this happens, we often find ourselves wondering when love flew out of the window. Well, perhaps the love is still there, but then, so is the anger.
 
When an argument erupts between couples, it is generally characterized by raving and ranting. Each attempts to prove that he/she is right. This one up-manship over the other only creates more problems. Ultimately, they end up fighting for fightings sake. After a few hours even the main reason for the quarrel may be long forgotten as each one takes the other head-on. Past blunders and petty issues are brought up as each viciously tears the other apart. Slamming doors and flinging objects becomes a habit. Hostility becomes a way of life. This is a typical case of collapse of communication when anger takes over.
 
Assertive Communication to Control Anger in Relationships: It is critical to use assertiveness when dealing with anger related issues in a relationship. Aggression only gives birth to violence and misery. On the other hand, avoidance to deal with anger displays weakness and timidity. A balance must be struck to keep the channels of communication flowing. In a crisis situation, rather than behaving like spoilt brats, partners should sit down and discuss the issue civilly. Active listening is important to understand the emotions of the other. Each one should be allowed to speak without interruptions. Anger often is a cover for deep-seated emotions like low self-worth, guilt, insecurity and depression. An attempt must be made to get to the root cause of the problem. Speaking politely and maintaining an unruffled exterior helps a great deal in soothing frayed nerves. Playing the blame game is definitely not an option. If the situation is overly tense, it is better to agree to take a break and do something you enjoy. Things like gardening, reading and television can be used to take the mind off worries. Once both partners calm down, they should try to come to a conclusion without biting the others head off. The tone of your voice should not be accusing and high-pitched. On the other hand whining and nagging is also a put-off. Being polite and courteous pays off. Assertive Communication is a good strategy to control and minimize the negative effects of anger on a relationship.
 
Anger and Fear control skills can be learned in an anger management program, it would be most helpful if the curriculum focused on anger management, stress management, assertive communication, and emotional intelligence.
 
Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.
 
Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.
 
Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

 

What is Anger: Identifying the Need for Help with Anger

anger 5Anger is an emotional state.  It can be triggered by both internal and external cues.  As an emotion, anger is a natural response and serves many purposes. It is based in human biology (as are other emotions) and serves us through the survival drive in its most fundamental form.  Anger is a strong protective force.  It creates physiological responses that signal us and prepare us to take action if needed by the drive to survive. 

 Apart from its basic and instinctual purpose, however, anger is also useful in protecting one’s self psychologically and emotionally.  Feelings of anger can signal, for example, that one feels taken advantage of, dismissed or violated in some way.  It helps us to set boundaries when such conditions have arisen. 

Anger is typically driven by perception and interpretation of events and situations.  Do I perceive danger?  Do I perceive threat?  These are the unspoken, often consciously unthought questions that our anger will answer.  Additionally, anger is a subjective, very personal response.  What angers one may not even be noteworthy to another.  In many important ways, personal history and how we have learned to cope with others and the world will determine whether or not anger is experienced.  Similarly, personal history and coping patterns will determine how angry one will be.

Anger becomes problematic when behaviors follow that are harmful to yourself or others.  Anger is also problematic when behaviors create the risk of harm to self or others.  For many individuals who do not behave in anger to the point of aggression or physical self-harm, anger can be sabotaging enough to create significant problems.  For example, anger is problematic if one’s goals and/or emotional and psychological wellbeing are compromised by anger.  Similarly, the individual who is chronically angry may sabotage his own goals and/or emotional and psychological wellbeing.

Certainly, anger is problematic when aggression and violence are used to express anger.  Harm to others through physical expressions, or threats of such, can have serious social and legal consequences.  Ultimately, the feeling of anger and the use of angry behavior can control one’s life. Consequently, negative consequences occur and accumulate.  While anger itself is a normal, very human emotion, aggressive behaviors are typically not.  Aggressions, and threats of aggression, are emergency responses. 

Disruptive patterns of angry behavior that are ‘out of proportion’ for the seriousness of the triggering event need intervention. 

Managing anger can be learned by attending an Anger Management Program; it would be in your best interest if the program curriculum focuses on anger management, stress management, assertive communication, and emotional intelligence.   

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Questions About Anger


Anyone who lives with an abusive partner knows how difficult it is to make it through the night. Anyone who works under a sullen boss knows how tough it is to make it through the day. Anger can shatter homes and destroy lives.

 

Remember the student who picked up his gun and took shots at his classmates. Do you recall the husband who burnt his wife and children and then put a bullet through his head? Well, this is anger speaking loud and clear.

 

Our streets are not safe to walk on partly on account of people who can’t manage their anger issues. If we find ourselves losing our cool at the drop of a hat, we need to ask questions and we need to ask them now.

 

Here are some Frequently Asked Questions about Anger:

 

Why do we feel angry? Experts suggest that we get angry because we feel threatened. The threat may be real or imagined. Anger is very often a direct result of other emotions that we experience like depression, fear, guilt and embarrassment. Suppressing emotions can also lead to frustration and anger. Something we perceive as being unfair can trigger feelings of rage and fury.

 

Is it normal to get angry? We’re human. Getting angry at some point of time or the other is inevitable. Denying anger is only going to make matters worse. What counts is not whether we get angry or not but how we respond when angry. However, if you find yourself in a perpetual state of rage, there’s probably a deep rooted issue that needs urgent attention.

 

Is it okay to vent my anger on someone or something when angry? This is a tricky question. Some experts say that venting your anger releases pent-up emotions and cools you down quicker. However, others argue that venting your anger on something or someone is dangerous and only serves to make you think about it frequently. Besides, breathing fire down somebody else’s neck could be nerve-racking for them. If you experience mild to moderate anger issues this may be a good option. However, if you have a severe anger management issue, avoid venting your temper on anything or anybody around you.

 

Is it okay to display my anger when I find something to be unjust? Standing up for your rights is not a bad thing. But you should attempt to do it in a positive manner rather than being offensive or stooping too low. Assertive communication helps in expressing feelings positively and stating needs. Being too aggressive only infuriates those around you and blows the situation out of proportion. 

 

What can I do to minimize the anger I’m experiencing? Deep breathing for a couple of minutes or more is supposed to be the ultimate anger antidote. Try counting to ten, twenty or even hundred if you feel like you’re losing control. Focusing on things other than the predicament you’re in takes your mind off the problem. Yoga and aerobics helps to an extent. Expressing feelings in an assertive manner is a good idea.

 

Can developing Emotional Intelligence help in curbing anger?

Emotional intelligence involves recognizing, understanding and regulating our emotions and those of others. The first step is awareness. When we are angry, all we can think about is the problem. We lose the capacity to think clearly. If we are aware that we are angry we’ll be able to judge the situation carefully and manage our reaction to it. Emotional intelligence also implies understanding and empathizing with the emotions of others. If we are able to comprehend what the opposite person is going through, this may soothe our temper to reach an amicable situation.

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert
 

Why Anger Assessments are Important


Anger is only an emotion. It is witnessed in the best of us and the worst of us. Experiencing anger certainly does not make us lesser human-beings.

 

If it’s only a feeling-an emotion, why do we let it take control of our lives?

 

Good Question. The answer though is not that simple. Anger may be an emotion but it is a complex emotion. This is because everyone does not experience and express anger in the same fashion. Some react immediately while others may go on a slow burn for days before exploding in a fit of temper. 

 

Displays of anger at work have become quite common place these days. Line workers are more prone to violent outbursts as compared to top level executives. In factories and manufacturing units, it’s not uncommon to stumble on workers sabotaging property and instigating strikes when their demands are not met. Higher level executives also have their fair share of anger related issues. These executives have deadlines to meet and responsibilities towards management. When things fail to go as planned, work pressure takes its toll and they sometimes react with hostility.

 

Domestic violence is a direct result of mismanaged and misplaced anger. Anger momentarily blinds and causes people to lash out at anything in front of them. “Angerholics” do not think twice before spewing their venom on their partners or even their children for that matter.

 

There are some people who come across as being angry all the time. Even, when things are apparently normal, they are simmering under the surface. The root cause may be traced to an unhappy childhood, low self-esteem, drug addiction and feelings of guilt and denial.

 

Anger Assessment: An anger assessment is necessary to gauge how far a person will go when angry. A properly designed assessment program will indicate how bad the anger is and the degree to which anger management is needed. It entails asking the participant to answer a few questions based on which certain conclusions are drawn. The questions are framed in such a way so as to judge whether a person is emotionally mature or faces mild to extreme anger issues.

 

Some typical anger assessment questions are:

·        How often do you get aggressive?

·        How often do you resort to violence like punching or assaulting someone?

·        Do insignificant things irritate you when angry?

·        Do you get abusive verbally or use expletives?

·        Do you make nasty and hurtful remarks when angry?

·        How long does it take for you to cool down?

·        Do you vent your temper on things other than your object of anger?

·        Have you hit your immediate boss or anyone else in authority?

·        Have you ever punched a cop?

 

Based on the answers to these questions, people are categorized as having mild, moderate or highly severe anger management concerns.

 

Anger Assessment and Anger Management: Anger assessment is the first step towards anger management. If the degree to which a person experiences anger and the extent to which he’ll go is measured, anger management can be directed more specifically. Since every individual is unique, customized anger management can be done for individual cases. Anger assessment judges the level of anger experienced and reactions to it. Anger management takes off from here. Judging how bad the situation really is helps focusing on finding a solution.

 

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

 

The Disruptive Physician and Emotionality

trainingDedication, commitment, investment…hard work and vision.  These are the givens.  The personality characteristics that help those seeking a career in medicine succeed, however, can also be the very same characteristics that can eventually undermine the practitioner’s workplace effectiveness and personal well-being. 

Most will enter training with an altruistic desire and vision to be of service, to make a meaningful contribution to others and to attain a sense of personal achievement and career satisfaction.  Our culture reinforces that vision.  Physicians are held in high regard, valued for their achievement and their contributions to the well-being of others. 

As in many such service careers, the vision of the young practitioner can drive and sustain the momentum of achievement.   Unfortunately, the rigors and realities of training and clinical practice can steadily obscure that original vision.  Physicians can find themselves so entrenched ‘in the trenches’ that survival, not vision, becomes the driving force in daily practice.  Many feel ‘locked in’ to move forward despite the personal toll and emotional costs.  As the dream subsides into an often harsh awakening, emotions can run high.  The original vision of service can recede behind fatigue, a workplace with limited resources, the constraints of externally imposed regulation and the complications of finding ethical balance in a reality of limited control and legal liability.

It is not easy to accommodate the erosion of one’s vision.  And, it is not easy in the demands of daily practice to maintain a visionary perspective on just what this chosen profession is really all about.  The bigger picture, the personal stake and mission in this work, can be hard to keep in focus.  At times, the physician can grieve the loss of that perspective feeling more that being on call, charting, doing rounds and paying malpractice premiums win out in the daily grind. 

Collegial relationships are valuable in renewing perspective, re-envisioning the bigger picture and rejuvenating the physician who has been in the trenches for long stretches of time.  The realities of daily practice, however, more often require the physician to practice in relative isolation even in a workplace shared with other physicians.  Colleagues who are equally busy with the demands of their own daily practice are not always available to provide quality support in decision-making about patient care, in peer supervision or personal support.  Many physicians will find themselves, in such work conditions, having lost the bigger picture of why they are working so hard.  Such a loss of perspective can cause resentment and emotional depletion.  Emotionally-driven decisions and behaviors that even further complicate the stress of daily practice become more likely.  Unable to gain perspective in the rush and demands of daily work, the overworked and under-supported physician might find that workplace behaviors have begun to deteriorate into emotionality rather than professionalism.

Anger Management Institute of Texas’ Executive Coaching Program is utilized by management of accredited hospital/organizations for physicians displaying disruptive behaviors in the workplace.

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.dvi-tx.com
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert