Angry Employees in the Workplace

We spend a major portion of our lives at work. No job comes with a stress-free tag. If we want to work we have to accept the stress, pressures and responsibilities associated with it. In simple words, you can’t have your cake and eat it too. The stress and pressure we face at work often gives way to frustration and anger.

 

No organization can function without manpower. Employees form the heart and soul of any organization. A company with a dynamic workforce can climb heights never scaled before. In contrast, a company which continually finds itself the victim of strikes and lockouts may be forced to shut down. Therefore, it can be said that “The Employee Maketh the Organization. 

 

An angry employee can create havoc in the organization. Angry employees have been known to get violent, damage company property, destroy valuable records and even reveal important trade secrets to the competition. They are found at every level of the hierarchy beginning from line workers to top level executives. Therefore, in present times companies are coming up with ways to deal with this tricky problem. Managers play a crucial rule in resolving issues related to unruly employees.

 

Dealing with an Angry Employee: When an employee expresses anger it is extremely necessary to tackle it immediately. Managers have to devote some time to this exercise. This exhibits concern for the employee and his feelings. Procrastination can often result in the employee getting out of hand and creating a crisis situation.

 

Sizing up the manner in which angry employees deal with their co-workers may give management valuable insight on how to control the situation. 

 

For employees who are always boiling under the surface, anger management classes may be a good idea to prevent them from harming themselves and causing trouble at work. Managers should allow employees to express their grievances without interrupting them.  Interruptions cause strife and may end up creating unnecessary diversions from the main subject. Active listening by managers conveys to the employee that the management is concerned and willing to be objective.

It is imperative to have proper procedures in place for addressing employee grievances. There should be a box or a register of complaints that disgruntled employees can use to make management aware of their problems.

 

Preferably, the issue should be tackled in private. Many employees have reservations about opening up in front of their colleagues. If the employee is enraged and wants to go head-to-head in public then use tact and diplomacy to deal with him.

 

Anger Management for the Angry Employee: Managers have to be cognizant of the signs of angry employees in the workforce. The early symptoms will include regular late-coming, absenteeism, tardiness and back-biting. Once these signs are recognized, immediate action must be taken. Rather than reprimanding and humiliating the employee, management should make immediate arrangements to invest in Anger Management programs to enable employees cope with their stress and anger related issues. The organization should review its culture and make time for interacting with employees through planning of picnics and parties quarterly or half-yearly. Intermingling with employees in informal settings creates goodwill and understanding. Managing anger among employees is a pre-requisite to boosting their morale and enhancing productivity.

 

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

 

The Many Faces Of Anger

Having over thirty years experience as a psychotherapist, I have seen anger expressed in many of its forms, by omission and commission. Usually we have a way of expressing anger that is our signature, that is a way of being angry that we resort to over and over again, when we are in conflict. Habits have power because usually, we are unaware and we react unconsciously or automatically. Think for instance of where you place your tooth-brush. Every morning you reach in the same direction, without conscious thought unless it has been moved. Moving it breaks the automatic habit, as you become aware and notice you have to reach in a different direction. Many of our daily routines are similar response, i.e. automatic.

Like feelings in general, anger in and of itself is not good or bad. Its just a feeling. Feelings well up in us, as urges to go to the bathroom well up, without conscious invitation. It’s what you do with the feelings that will make a difference in the quality of your life and how it affects those near and dear. Most of us do not know, how to express anger appropriately, we’ve never been taught. Anger is feared, denied, projected and denounced. Often people associate any expression of anger with the extreme end of the spectrum, that of violence. Often and especially in relationships, it is the inability to express anger properly, that can escalate into violence.

On an anger spectrum; at one end we see irritability, grumpiness, negativity, criticism, resentment and judgemental behavior. These are milder forms of anger, but anger nonetheless. Our society seems to be more tolerant of the lesser forms, and our family conditioning allows it. Maybe because it is so prevalent, it is not addressed for what it really is, inappropriate anger. In the middle, is anger that has less intensity and is more amenable to appropriate expression. As it moves towards the other side, we encounter greater intensity as rage, fury, indignation and wrath. These levels of anger indicate on some level, a loss of control, a level of destructiveness verging on madness and violence. Wrath often implies not only rage and moral indignation but also a desire to punish. So where are you on this spectrum? Generally every individual has a troublesome spot. I read a quote from a Master who lived in the mountains. He answered several of life’s hard questions for the inquirer without hesitation. When asked how to handle anger, he broke his walking stick in half and bellowed “Do you think I’d be living alone in this deserted place if I had the answer to that?” Sooner or later we all have to come down from the mountain, and deal with fellow humans in the market place. Someone is invariably going to step on our toe, …. it!!

As a clinician, except for violent people, who take an extreme position and I very seldom work with, it’s the “nice nice’ anger avoiders, or deniers that give me the most trouble. If you are not willing or able to become aware of how you act out or project your anger, its like pulling teeth. They deny their anger, or fear it and fear it in others. They are also more likely to project it onto others. Not me, but them. Often avoiders have since childhood pushed down any version of angry feelings and may not be able to identify how it reveals itself in their lives. Maybe in childhood they were afraid to express, or lived in a violent home where an individual expressing could lead to violence. Nobody helped them differentiate violence from normal levels of dissatisfaction.

Sometimes it’s a woman living the “Christian Way”, who has mistakenly misinterpreted assertiveness and personal power, as aggressive, and non Christian. This is a hard nut to crack. One woman with the above profile, had Bible quote answers for many things including “turning the other cheek”. She however loved to attend boxing matches, and football games. She was videoed by her son, yelling “kill him, kill him” when she got fired up at these public spectator sports. Monday morning she was back to her “other cheek” way. She was unable to connect the dots as to how she projected her denied rage onto others. Her three children felt unheard, and experienced having no permission to express anything that wasn’t sweetness and light in her presence. When they grew to young adulthood, they limited their contact with her. She asked over and over “why are you upset with me?” “I haven’t done anything” She couldn’t express her own anger, and caused her children and others about her to feel guilty when they had their feelings. This mother was in fact a crazy maker, and it was sane of the children to keep their distance. She controlled others and frustrated them with avoidance, forgetting, being self righteous, thwarting plans, being late, etc. This behavior is so nebulous, one can’t get it out of the vapors, and make sense of it. You feel the disconnect with reality, but its hard for the average person to put a finger on exactly what is going on. Even in treatment such people usually have to be in a life altering crisis, to surrender their mask or ego, long enough to see the cracks in their cosmic egg.

I’m much prefer to work with anger that is available. Sometimes it is not pretty, its down right toxic, however its more available for exploration and change, than the suppressed and the denied. Anger is passion which indicates there is energy available for work if a person is ready to change. It is a big “if” due to the fact some people are addicted to anger. In the moment of their explosion, they feel powerful and for others it is a “rush” a high, that makes them feel at least temporarily more alive. The habit of anger then feeds the addiction as they get a surge of adrenalin and other feel good hormones. At this point it becomes more than a bad habit, its emotional excitement. You know of people who create some drama when life evens out. For people who rely on their anger in this way, the intense feelings keep their life from being dull, because they haven’t learned other ways of experiencing personal power.

You and I know that daily we rub up against situations that can if we allow it will trigger our anger. As matter of fact if we reacted to every opportunity to become angry, we’d be constantly angry. How about people who carry a well of shame, a high level of sensitivity and low self esteem. The slightest criticism sets off all three of the above stated characteristics. It can become explosive and blaming as well as projected on to whomever gets in their way. Usually their buttons have been pushed and inside of the raging adult is a child possessed, feeling vulnerable and out of control. Road rage is such an example. “How dare you cut me off, as others cut me off in the past, and I am justified in my rage toward you and a wanting to hurt you.” Of course all of this isn’t thought out, it a reaction to what is smoldering in the persons unconscious. The evidence of what is in the unconscious is the menancing, excessive, out of proportion , out of control behavior.

Some people suffer from black and white thinking, failing to be flexible enough to include others who are different. This concrete way of looking at a the world is quite prevalent in children until the age of reason. Some people get stuck at this level of development, and have a simplistic view of the world. This group spews moralistic anger towards others, when those others have broken the rules. Its as if they have a patent on what is right in the world and in order to protect it, they make others wrong. The offenders are labeled by this self-righteous group as bad, evil, wicked, sinful and deserve to be punished. So if one is different from the tribe, or from the church group, one may be harshly judged. It is interesting at times to look at the lives of the judges of how others should be. The ridigity of the frame they put around how others should live, is often frightening. What is more frightening is that this kind of thinking and anger is very prevalent in out society, at every level, from the highest offices to the person in the street. Such people claim moral superiority.

Hate happens when a person doesn’t resolve anger and allows no window of compassion or forgiveness to enter. Its really a hardened anger when one person decides that another person in totally wrong or evil or both. Its usually the cause of ongoing rumination, in the hater, who despises the offender and won’t let go or soften towards him or her. Sometimes the hater experiences secondary gain by seeing themselves as innocent and a victim.

You may see yourself in one or more of the examples I have given. You may wonder if you are able to change a life long habit of this nature. The first step is to become aware of what you do and how you do it. If you have an intention and willingness to change the way you express anger, it is certainly doable. Next time I’ll start with tools to address different modes of anger and the problems it causes in your life.

By Laura B. Young, LMFT http://www.LifeResourceCenter.net

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Effective Help With Your Anger

When was the last time you felt really angry? Has it been a month, week, a day, yesterday, an hour ago or do you just feel angry all the time?

Anger is not tangible. It’s not something you can get hold of with your bare hands and toss away. Anger may be a symptom of stress, depression, childhood memories or feelings of low self-esteem. Some people actually take a perverse pleasure in anger because possibly it’s the only time they feel in control of the situation. Anger gives them a high and a sensation of power especially when people are terrified of their tempers.

 

Anger is not confined to a particular type of person. Everybody gets angry at sometime or the other. However, the responses and reactions to anger vary from person to person. Why is it that some people rave and rant when angry and others are able to maintain some semblance of composure even if boiling inside? Well, a lot of it depends on our family background, the company we keep and our ability to adjust to everyday stress and pressures. If we come from a household where people scream and yell to make a point, it’s quite possible we’ll end up doing the same if faced with a difficult situation. This is because we subconsciously pick up behavioral patterns and traits from our immediate surroundings. 

 

Impulsive people are more prone to expressing anger rather violently. They act before they think and repent in leisure. Have you ever had a boss who flings files when he’s angry? Perhaps, you’re one of those employees who everybody avoids because your temper scares the living daylights out of them. Does your partner leave town each time you show signs of throwing a fit? If you find yourself flying off the handle at the least sign of provocation, you might want to consider getting help with anger.

 

Help With Anger: If you want to quit interrupting your progress at work and at the domestic front because of bouts of rage, seek help with anger. Anger destroys and devastates. People have recognized the need to start anger management programs to deal with anger related issues. Numerous local certified anger management providers have begun these programs. They are conducted in groups or on a one-to-one basis which is called Anger Management – Executive Coaching. Anger management groups involves people facing similar issues expressing feelings, thoughts and experiences. Yoga is also a great way to de-stress and unwind as it follows the principles of calm and composure in adverse circumstances. Reading self-help books covering anger related behavioral issues can help to an extent, but the best course of action is to attend an anger management class facilitated by a certified anger management facilitator.

 

Help with Anger through Stress Management: There is no escape from stress. However, we can’t let stress build up to a point that anger or even rage takes over. Stress management is closely related to anger management. If you can learn to manage stress effectively, anger related issues get resolved automatically. Stress can be managed effectively through a combination of techniques like laughter therapy, meditation, listening to soothing music, watching television and going on a vacation with family and friends. We can certainly minimize what we can’t eliminate altogether. Minimizing stress through successful stress management techniques is a step towards managing and controlling anger.  

 

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

An Open Letter to Judges, Prosecuting Attorneys and Human Resource Managers about Anger Management Classes

Person-directed aggression and all forms of rage are dramatically increasing worldwide. While anger management is the most effective intervention for unhealthy anger, the lack of state or local standards poses risks for those in the position to mandate employees or defendants to attend such classes.

Currently, there are no regulations mandated for anger management providers anywhere. Consequently, Judges and Human Resource Managers have few guidelines to use in mandating perpetrators of “disruptive behavior” to attend coaching or anger management classes.

One unintended consequence of the absence of state or county standards in this area is the tendency to inappropriately refer such clients to counseling, psychotherapy, or domestic violence providers. According to the American Psychiatric Association, anger is a normal human emotion rather than a nervous or mental disorder. Therefore, anger is not responsive to psychotherapy or psychotropic medication.

Anger is a problem when it:

·Is too intense
·Occurs too frequently
·Lasts too long
·Leads to aggression or violence
·Has health consequences
·Destroys work or personal relationships

Providers of anger management must have a minimum of 40 hours of Facilitator Certification training, 16 hours of continuing education each year, an evidenced based curriculum which includes pre and post tests, client workbooks, CDs, DVDs and other ancillary training materials.

Anger management classes are designed to teach skill enhancement in recognizing and managing anger, stress, assertive communication and increasing empathy or emotional intelligence.

A list of Certified Anger Management Facilitators in the United States and Canada can be found by clicking here.

By George Anderson, MSW, BCD, CAMF http://www.andersonservices.com

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Houston, Texas Anger Management Classes

Fast Track Anger Management Classes Every Saturday and Sunday of the month.

If you’ve been court ordered to complete an anger management class by a certain date, and you don’t have the time to attend weekly classes or due to unseen circumstances and procrastination you find yourself out of time to attend weekly classes to meet your court ordered deadline — this series of weekend classes is available for you.

Class Schedule:

It is recommended, but not required, all Self Referral and Employer Referral students complete 16 Hours of Anger Management to receive a Certificate of Completion.

• Employer referrals need written documentation from Employer detailing the required number of hours if enrolling for less than 16 hours.

The 16 Hours came be completed in 2 weekends if you attend 8 hours per weekend (Sat & Sun) or in 1 month if you attend 4 hours per weekend. You can choose when and what days you want to attend as long as you complete 4 hours in Anger Management, 4 hours in Stress Management, 4 hours in Assertive Communication, and 4 hours in Emotional Intelligence within an 8 week time period.

Other Class Options are available:

8 Hours classes:The 8 Hours can be completed in 1 weekend if you attend 4 hours Saturday, and 4 hours Sunday or you can attend 2 Saturdays or 2 Sundays. The 8 hours must be completed with a 4 week time period.

12 Hours Classes: The 12 Hours can be completed in 2 weekends or a mixture of Saturday and Sunday 4 hours classes. The 12 hours must be completed with an 8 week time period.

Saturdays: 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Sundays:1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Fees: Classes – $20 per hour
Anger Assessment and Workbook available for purhase, but not required – $30 Each.

Please call 281-477-9105 or visit http://www.ami-tx.com for additional information.

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

 

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

 

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com

 

 

Disruptive Physician Behavior and JCAHO Standards

When I speak with hospital administrators, many times the topic of disruptive physician behavior comes up. Now that has some obvious reasons. Disruptive physician behavior can damage the hospitals reputation tremendously and it can cost the organization lots of money. It is actually estimated that unnecessary turnover rates alone costs health care organizations more than $150,000 per disruptive physician. Additionally, a new survey about physician-nurse relationships uncovers a strikingly high prevalence of disruptive physician behavior that is affecting nurse retention. It showed that disruptive behavior by physicians is contributing to fuel the nationwide nursing shortage, heavily impacting job satisfaction and morale for nurses.The survey results also revealed the seriousness of the issue and highlight a lack of physician awareness, appreciation, value and respect for nurses.

As a result, disruptive physician behavior has a negative impact on patient quality care and increases the likelihood of medical errors.Now what is disruptive physician behavior? There are many definitions available; however, the American Medical Association sums it up succinctly by “defining disruptive behavior as a style of interaction with physicians, hospital personnel, patients, family members, or others that interferes with patient care.” Obviously, disruptive behavior cannot be neglected and needs to be addressed at the organizational level. Of course every hospital has a process in place how they address those kind of interferences but unfortunately, the success rates are many times not as high as they envision them. So what else can be done to reduce disruptive behavior? When you look at the incidences closely, you can see that disruptive physician behavior is the result of a lack of self-management, a lack of interpersonal skills or both. No physicians gets up in the morning with the intention of cussing a nurse out, interrupting the success of their surgery by throwing instruments through the OR, or screaming at a hospital administrator. I don’t think that any physician has such bad intentions because then they would definitely not be suited for this profession and should look for a job where human interactions are non existent.

Instead, I look at disruptive physician behavior as a sign that their self-management and interpersonal skills are underdeveloped. At the end disruptive behavior is the symptom of an underlying cause, call it frustration with life, overwhelm with their professional responsibilities, inability to cope with the demands of life, incapability to effectively communicate with people. Handing the physician a warning or having a conversations with the physician about repercussions will not cure the behavior but rather only band aid on it. In order to get to the source of the behavior, the conversations and the revelations have to go deeper and need to address topics such as:- how to effectively control oneself in stressful situations- how to resolve conflict with a win-win outcome- how to communicate effectively in any kind of situation- how to resolve frustrations and strive to create more harmony and balance in one’s life and many more.

As a result, rather than educating and lecturing physicians about the negative consequences of their behaviors, hospitals need to invest time and resources into preventative workshops that address those skills, performing self-assessments, increasing staff awareness of the issue, opening lines of communication and creating great collaboration among peers.If hospitals don’t do this, the problem will continue to grow and patients, nurses, and the financial situation of the organization will continue to needlessly suffer. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”- Henry de Bracton, De Legibus in 1240. I look forward to your comments and hearing from you.

By Iris Grimm

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert

Costs of Coworker Bullying: Anger Management Training Needed in the Workplace

Workplace bullying has been a hot topic since the release of the 2007 Zogby survey, which showed that 49% of American workers report that they’ve been the target of a bully’s bad behavior.  Employers have begun instituting tolerance training and implementing respectful-workplace policies.  Awareness is key in preventing this prevalent workplace disease. One way to make top management place value on eliminating jerks at work is to talk dollars.

Bullying costs companies big money. Here are some of the ways that your bottom line is directly affected if you fail to eradicate bullying at work:

1. Targeted employees have higher absenteeism rates

Wouldn’t you? When the workplace becomes increasingly intolerable and unpleasant, people stop coming to work.

2. Decreased productivity

Those who do manage to get themselves into work are less productive.  They’re nursing emotional wounds, meaning they’re more likely to hide in their office than dare engage with others at the risk of being put on the firing range. Stress-related illness is not conducive to high productivity, either.  If you don’t feel well, you’re not putting your best efforts into your work.

3. High turnover

Replacing an employee can cost a business up to 3 times that employee’s yearly salary. And dedicated, enthusiastic employees are not easy to find. Yet, employees who are bullied at work will almost certainly leave. Some leave because of their health. Others leave because the bully has succeeded in sabotaging their reputation.

4. Unhealthy Employees Are Expensive

Employers have campaigned to rid the workplace of smokers, who are more costly to insure. Obese employees may be next on the list. But what about bullied employees? Targets are affected with depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, which is especially common with male targets, and other stress-related illnesses. Physiological illnesses, such as headaches and backaches.

5. Infected-Workplace Syndrome

As devastating as these effects can be, they can, and likely will, get worse. Bullies are infectious and contagious. Other employees who witness bullying behavior feel sympathy for their coworkers and guilt for doing nothing about it. They shrivel up, just like the target, in the fear that the bully will turn his or her anger towards them next.

Posted by Molly DiBianca On August 18, 2008 In: Jerks & Bullies at Work

Anger Management Institute of Texas is a certified Anderson & Anderson ® provider.

Anger Management Classes and Anger Management – Executive Coaching available in Houston, Texas.

Gregory A. Kyles, M.A., LPC, CEAP, CAMF
Director, Anger Management Institute of Texas
Diplomate, President of Texas Chapter
American Association of Anger Management Providers
http://www.ami-tx.com
http://www.ami-tx.org
https://gregorykyles.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorykyles
http://www.myspace.com/anger_management_expert